Sustainable Agriculture

GOATS

MEET BEAVER POND’S GOATS

Miranda

Goats were one of the first domesticated animals in the world — even before dogs. Farmers often employ goats for milk and fiber production, as well as clearing unwanted vegetation — herbicide free! Three goats live at Beaver Ponds Environmental Education Center: one pygmy goat that produces cashmere fiber and two angoras, which produce mohair. We use the goats to teach people about fiber education options, as well as animal husbandry education.

PYGMY GOATS

Miranda arrived at Beaver Ponds Environmental Education Center April 14, 2013 from Jabberwocky Farm. Miranda has dark fiber. Pygmy goats originated in West Africa and were imported as exotic animals, mostly in the 1950s. Males weigh 60-85 pounds, and females weigh 50-75 pounds. Farmers often favor them for their small size and milk production.

ANGORA GOATS

Kahale (Ka-hall-ee) and Jelly Bean are angora goats from Sister Sheep. The fiber collected from angora goats is called mohair. These two boys joined Beaver Ponds April 16, 2013. Because Jelly Bean was gelded at a later age than Kahale, his overall size and horns are larger. Angora goats are smaller than most goats (except pygmy goats) and sheep. Mature males weigh between 180-225 pounds, and females only weigh 70-110 pounds.

Kahale (Ka-hall-ee) and Jelly Bean

Angora goats originated from Asia Minor and date back to B.C. times. Throughout the centuries, people have valued angora goats for their mohair, which is smoother than wool. Its strong, elastic fiber results in durable upholstery and other fabrics. An average angora goat yields about 10 ½ pounds of mohair when sheared twice a year. At Beaver Ponds Environmental Education Center, we shear our angoras to gather fiber; shearing is akin to getting a haircut at the barbershop. In contrast, we harvest our cashmeres’ fiber by combing, rather than shearing, due to the goats’ fine undercoat, because if we cut it, we would need to meticulously separate the loose coarse hairs from the loose, finer undercoat. Visit Beaver Ponds Environmental Education Center to see the “exotic” West African pygmy goat, and experience, firsthand, the difference between goats that produce cashmere and goats that produce mohair.
Birthdates
Miranda – April 2012
Jelly Bean – April 12, 2009
Kahale – May 3, 2011

Events & Programs

Winters are wonderful at Beaver Ponds.
Here are some upcoming programs and events.

Forest Camp at Beaver Ponds - March Friday Sessions
March 1, 8, 15, 22 - 9am to 1pm
COST: $150 per child for all 4 Fridays
AGES 4-7
A nature immersion camp awakening a sense of wonder and reverence for the natural world.
Forest exploration followed by lunch and nature-inspired art.
For more information, contact Briana Legaspi at blegaspi@beaverponds.org or call (719) 838-0143,
visit our website here or CLICK HERE to download a printable PDF with all the information you'll need!


SnowSchool at Beaver Ponds
March 16, 2019 - 9:30am to NOON
Class Theme: Winter Survival
COST: $35 per child  AGES 8-12

A magical morning of snow science and games while enjoying a snowshoe hike!

For more information, contact Briana Legaspi at blegaspi@beaverponds.org or call (719) 838-0143, visit our website here
or CLICK HERE to download a printable PDF with all the information you'll need!

Latest Articles

Worms 101

Did you know that Beaver Ponds has worms? They’re the good kind, though, and they are also kind of amazing. Red Wigglers, or Eisenia foetida, are a special species of smaller earthworm native to Europe that have adapted to living in decaying organic material. These...

read more

STAYING OUT LONGER

I have a childhood memory of losing a boot in a snowstorm. My brother and the neighborhood kids found my lost boot and helped me home.

read more

Contact Us

PO Box 995
2234 Busch Run Road
Fairplay, CO 80440
info@beaverponds.org
719.838.0143

Get Social

Beaver Ponds Environmental Education Center (BPEEC) helps people of all ages experientially learn about domestic livestock, horticulture, green energy generation and environmental conservation in a high-alpine, natural setting at Sacramento Creek Ranch near Fairplay, Colorado.

 

PROTECT

PRESERVE

EDUCATE

Newsletter

Learn about upcoming events and programs before anyone else.

We could use a helping hand...

Donate now to our new partner MALT today!